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Mastering Liquid Embolics, Zaragoza (ES), October 25-26, 2018

Programme Local Hosts | Faculty | Venue | Registration Fees | Accommodation 

CME Credit Allowance

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Liquid embolics are being used more and more by interventional radiologists. High embolic efficiency and good clinical results are the main strength of these embolic agents. The learning curve is high, however, as liquid management and technical aspects are different and more complex than using conventional coils or particles.

In general, liquid embolics can be classified into three main groups: cyanoacrylate (glue), non-adhesive DMSO-based embolics and sclerosants foams. Although these products have some similarities, they also have vast differences. DMSO-based embolics include ethylene-vinil-alcohol-copolimer-EVOH (onyx®, squid®), N-phenyl amide-modified methacrylate/acrylic acid copolymer (phil®) and iodinated polyvinyl alcohol polymer ether (easyx®). Sclerosants include alcohol, polidocanol and sotradecol that can be applied pure, mixed with contrast or in foam. Knowing the indications for use, chemical properties, clinical advantages and risks of these products is essential for a well-trained IR.

Training with liquid embolics in real models is very useful to gain the expertise that IRs need for the management of these products. Due to the similarity between pig and human anatomy, 25 to 30kg female pigs will be used by the attending doctors in order to learn how to deal with cyanoacrylates, DMSO-based embolics and sclerosants. Rete mirabilis in the pig head is a natural model of AVM which can be used to be filled with glue or EVOH. Kidneys are used to try different speeds of liquid injections and are also helpful in practicing and understanding the concepts of penetration and reflux. Pig ovarian veins are used with foams and sclerosants. A vet team will support the course by putting the pigs under general anaesthesia and taking care of them. Four high-quality image mobile C-arms will be available as well as a wide range of catheters, microcatheters, wires and embolics. Zaragoza University and doctors J. Urbano and M.A. de Gregorio have significant experience doing endovascular training on animal models.

 

​Please note that the ESIR course in Zaragoza is limited to 40 participants.

 

PROGRAMME 

Thursday, October 25, 2018

08:30-09:30    
Registration    
     
09:30-09:40    
Welcome and introduction to Saragossa University    
     
09:40-10:55    
Liquid embolics overview    
Embolisation with DMSO-based agents overview    
Embolisation with cyanoacrylates overview    
Differences between EVOH-based agents and cyanoacrylates
Embolisation with foam and sclerosants overview    
     
10:55-11:15    
Coffee break    
     
11:15-12:40    
What is the best formula for venous malformations?    
What is the best formula for PCS and varicocele?    
Gelified alcohol: Safety and control for alcohol injection    
Liquid embolics: Clinical results and literature review    
Liquid embolics: Complications and management    
Pig anatomy, animal welfare and groups distribution    
     
12:40-13:40    
Lunch    
     
13:40-15:40   13:40-15:40
GROUP A: Lectures   GROUP B: Animal Lab Training
Reflux, a limiting factor for EVOH embolisation   Reception and clothes change
Is there a role for EVOH in venous embolisation?   Discussion, tips and tricks and practice in a live case
Besides the cost, is there a rationale for usage of large quantities of EVOH?
Glue and EVOH for GI bleeding   Technique and tools for EVOH embolisation
My cases of endoleaks treated with liquids
My cases of portal vein embolisation treated with liquids   Technique and tools for glue embolisation
My bleeding cases treated with liquids   Polidocanol and sotradecol foam: Technique and tools
Bronchial embolisations treated with liquids
     
15:40-16:00    
Coffee break    
     
16:00-18:15   16:00-18:15
GROUP A: Lectures ctd.   GROUP B: Animal Lab Training ctd.
AVM treated with liquids: How do I do it?   Discussion, tips and tricks and practice in a live case
Visceral aneurysms treated with liquids: How do I do it?  
PCS treated with foam: How do I do it?
Varicocele treated with glue: How do I do it?   Technique and tools for EVOH embolisation
My two most challenging cases with liquids
My two most challenging cases with liquids  
My two most challenging cases with liquids Technique and tools for glue embolisation
My two most challenging cases with liquids  
My two most challenging cases with liquids
My two most challenging cases with liquids   Polidocanol and sotradecol foam: Technique and tools
Summary and discussion  

 

Friday, October 26, 2018

09:00-11:00   09:00-11:00
GROUP B: Lectures   GROUP A: Animal Lab Training
Reflux, a limiting factor for EVOH embolisation   Reception and clothes change
Is there a role for EVOH in venous embolisation?   Discussion, tips and tricks and practice in a live case
Besides the cost, is there a rationale for usage of large quantities of EVOH?  
Glue and EVOH for GI bleeding   Technique and tools for EVOH embolisation
My cases of endoleaks treated with liquids  
My cases of portal vein embolisation treated with liquids   Technique and tools for glue embolisation
My bleeding cases treated with liquids   Polidocanol and sotradecol foam: Technique and tools
Bronchial embolisations treated with liquids  
     
11:00-11:15    
Coffee break    
     
11:15-13:30   11:15-13:30
GROUP B: Lectures ctd.   GROUP A: Animal Lab Training ctd.
AVM treated with liquids: How do I do it?   Discussion, tips and tricks and practice in a live case
Visceral aneurysms treated with liquids: How do I do it?  
PCS treated with foam: How do I do it?  
Varicocele treated with glue: How do I do it?   Technique and tools for EVOH embolisation
My two most challenging cases with liquids  
My two most challenging cases with liquids  
My two most challenging cases with liquids   Technique and tools for glue embolisation
My two most challenging cases with liquids  
My two most challenging cases with liquids  
My two most challenging cases with liquids   Polidocanol and sotradecol foam: Technique and tools
Summary and discussion  
     
13:30    
Certificate of attendance    

 

LOCAL HOSTS 

M.A. de Gregorio, Zaragoza (ES)
J. Urbano, Madrid (ES)

 

FACULTY   

G. Carrafiello, Milan (IT)
M. Casares, Palma de Mallorca (ES)
M.A. de Gregorio, Zaragoza (ES)
R. Loffroy, Dijon (FR)
I. McCafferty, Birmingham (UK)
S. Sierre, Buenos Aires (AR)
J. Urbano, Madrid (ES)
M. Wojtaszek, Canterbury (UK)

 

VENUE 

CIBA Center (Biomedical Research Center of Aragon)
Av. San Juan Bosco no 13

50009 Zaragoza
SPAIN

 

REGISTRATION FEES 

Early Registration Fees (until August 30):

Course Registration - €900
CIRSE Member - €700

Late Registration Fees (from August 31): 

Course Registration - €1100
CIRSE Member - €900

​Please note that the ESIR course in Zaragoza is limited to 40 participants.

 

ACCOMMODATION 

Please note that the following are only suggestions. Accommodation is not included in the registration fee of ESIR courses. CIRSE supports compliance with ethical standards. Therefore, CIRSE emphasises that the participants shall bear any and all costs in this context themselves. 
 

Romareda Hotel:
C/ Asin y Palacios, 11
50009 Zaragoza
SPAIN
Phone: +34 976 35 11 00
E-mail: reservasromareda@ilunionhotels.com

https://en.ilunionromareda.com/
 

Petronila Hotel:
Avda Alcalde Sáinz de Varanda, 2
50009 Zaragoza
SPAIN
Phone: +34 876 54 11 36
Fax: +34 876 54 11 33
E-mail: hotelreinapetronila@palafoxhoteles.com

www.palafoxhoteles.com/en/zaragoza-hotels/hotel-reina-petronila
 

Hotel Palafox Zaragoza:
Marqués de Casa Jiménez, s/n

50004 Zaragoza
SPAIN
Phone: +34 976 23 77 00
Fax: +34 976 23 47 05
E-mail: hotelpalafox@palafoxhoteles.com

www.palafoxhoteles.com/en/zaragoza-hotels/hotel-palafox
 

Hotel Oriente:
Calle del Coso, 11-13

50003 Zaragoza
SPAIN
Phone: +34 976 203 282
E-mail: 
reservas@hotel-oriente.com
http://www.hotel-oriente.com/en

 

CME CREDIT ALLOWANCE 

The ESIR 2018: Mastering Liquid Embolics, Zaragoza, Spain, 25/10/2018-26/10/2018 has been accredited by the European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (EACCME®) with 10 European CME credits (ECMEC®s). Each medical specialist should claim only those hours of credit that he/she actually spent in the educational activity.

Through an agreement between the Union Européenne des Médecins Spécialistes and the American Medical Association, physicians may convert EACCME® credits to an equivalent number of AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Information on the process to convert EACCME® credit to AMA credit can be found at www.ama-assn.org/education/earn-credit-participation-international-activities

Live educational activities, occurring outside of Canada, recognised by the UEMS-EACCME® for ECMEC®s are deemed to be Accredited Group Learning Activities (Section 1) as defined by the Maintenance of Certification Program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.